Putting People Before Profits “THE HEALTHCARE MOVIE”

Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 7 pm
Corvallis-Benton County Public Library
645 NW Monroe Avenue, Corvallis

Discussion and Q & A
facilitated by Mid-Valley Health Care Advocates Board Members: Nadine Grzeskowiak, RN and Laurie Labbitt
This documentary provides the real story of how the health care systems in Canada and the United States evolved to be so completely different when at one point they were essentially the same.
Most people under the age of 50, in both countries, are not aware of the intensity of the political struggle that led to the universal medical care system in Canada. Nor are they aware of the public relations campaigns, still active today, that have been prevalent in the United States since the early 1900’s to dissuade the public from supporting national health care.
Produced by Canadian-American couple Laurie Simons and Terry Sterrenberg, The Healthcare Movie reveals the personal and emotional impact on Canadians who now have access to universal health care because of the heroism of people who took a stand nearly 50 years ago. It also reveals the continuing struggle in the United States between the fear of government intervention and the right to quality health care for all people. 

More information about health care costs can be found at the website: http://thehealthcaremovie.net/home/articles/

 

As Vermont Goes, So Goes [Oregon] the Nation?

Three years ago, Peter Shumlin, the governor of Vermont, signed a bill creating Green Mountain Care: a single-payer system in which, if all goes according to plan, the state will regulate doctors’ fees and cover Vermonters’ medical bills.

Green Mountain Care won’t begin until at least 2017, but Vermont liberals are optimistic. “Americans want to see a model that works,” Senator Bernie Sanders told The Atlantic in December. “If Vermont can be that model it will have a profound impact on discourse in this country.”

Before you dismiss that prospect as wishful thinking, consider: That’s how national health care happened in Canada. A third party’s provincial experiment paved the way for national reform. In 1946, the social-democratic government of Saskatchewan passed a law providing free hospital care to most residents. The model spread to other provinces, and in 1957 the federal government adopted a cost-sharing measure that evolved into today’s universal single-payer system.

Full article here.

NOTE: We are working hard to pass a similar bill in Oregon. Sign up for our newsletter updates, Like us on Facebook, and Follow us on Twitter to keep informed and see how you can help.

US rebuff of 'socialized medicine' baffles world health leaders

By Brett Wilkins
Feb 10, 2014 in Health

Why is the United States the only most-developed nation lacking some form of government-funded universal health care system?
Why are so many Americans, even those who support or rely upon government programs like Medicare, so vehemently opposed to 'socialized medicine?'
Why do so many Americans continue to believe theirs is the best health care system in the world, even when presented with irrefutable evidence to the contrary?
To help answer these questions, this Digital Journalist interviewed more than a dozen leading health officials from around the world and asked them to compare health care attitudes in their countries and in the United States. "It comes down to a difference in culture and character," said Dr. Fiona Godlee, editor-in-chief of the British Medical Journal (BMJ) and a fellow at the Royal College of Physicians in London. "In America, you've got this sense of individualism and Darwinian survival and opportunity to win. In the UK, we have this very strong sense that we have to provide for the weaker in our society."
"In the pursuit of excellence, people lost along the way do not count for much, and if you can buy excellent health care... if you can afford it, you get it. If you can't, you don't. You guys simply do not believe in equity," Leeder said of Americans.
So what do international health officials make of all the horror stories disseminated by US special interests about the lack of patient choice, 'rationed care,' 'death panels' and long waiting lists, stories apparently meant to scare an American populace that ranks 51st in global life expectancy away from public health care? "Any patient can at any time switch physicians. There are no 'death panels,'" insisted CMA president Francescutti. "Do we have slightly longer waits than Americans? Yes we do. But when you take a look at the indicators, we're faring better than you in just about every category, and you're spending twice as much money."
"What people should do at the end of the day is not exaggerate," added Dr. Francescutti. "Nobody gets turned away here. Nobody goes bankrupt if they have a heart attack. God forbid you have a heart attack in the United States and you don't have coverage." Indeed, unpaid medical bills are the number one cause of US bankruptcies, with nearly two million Americans affected in 2013.

Read this entire article here.